What is inspiring about Martin Luther King?

By his bold actions, and by using his God-given preaching talents to lead and to inspire, he motivated hundreds of thousands of others to take action. He showed them new ways – nonviolent ways – to stand up for the Civil Rights movement in America in the 1960s. He helped to change the course of history.

What makes Martin Luther King Jr inspiring?

An inspirational person of character, Martin Luther King, Jr. had a dream to change the world, and he transcended racial barriers to impact American society in a profound way. … One of the greatest qualities he possessed was extreme patience, an invaluable virtue, which helped him spread his message across America.

What positive impact did Martin Luther King have?

led a civil rights movement that focused on nonviolent protest. Martin Luther King’s vision of equality and civil disobedience changed the world for his children and the children of all oppressed people. He changed the lives of African Americans in his time and subsequent decades.

What is MLK legacy?

Martin Luther King Jr. dedicated his life to the nonviolent struggle for civil rights in the United States. King’s leadership played a pivotal role in ending entrenched segregation for African Americans and to the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, considered a crowning achievement of the civil rights era.

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How did Martin Luther changed the world?

Martin Luther stood up for his beliefs and changed the world forever. … Because of this, Martin wrote the 95 theses and started the Protestant Reformation, and fought bravely till the end of his days to legalize protestantism. Martin Luther was born November 10, 1483 in Eisleben, Germany.

What is the importance of Martin Luther King’s speech?

I Have a Dream, speech by Martin Luther King, Jr., that was delivered on August 28, 1963, during the March on Washington. A call for equality and freedom, it became one of the defining moments of the civil rights movement and one of the most iconic speeches in American history.